'We broke up today': Lindsay Lohan breaks silence on relationship rumours

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Los Angeles: Actress Lindsay Lohan has quashed rumours surrounding her mystery man,
rumoured to be the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman.
She has declared she is single. Lohan told Australia's The Kyle and Jackie O breakfast radio show that she has broken up
with her boyfriend, without revealing his name, reports "aceshowbiz.com". "I was seeing someone and we broke up today," Lohan said when asked about her
relationship status during the chat. "You wouldn't even know who he was.
I had a bit of a day." Lohan has been linked to Saudi prince since August when "Page Six" reported she was
being "flown around in private jets and showered with presents" by him. Representatives of Lohan, however, claimed the pair had met only once, that too
"around a year ago at a Formula One Grand Prix race". Right now, Lohan is focussed on her career. She plans to return on television once
again after her MTV reality series Lindsay Lohan…

Dallas Author Jennifer Allen Wants You To Stop Focusing on #RelationshipGoals and Worry About Your Own

Author Jennifer Allen wants you to stop swooning at other people's relationships and learn to work on your own.
Plastered under any lovey-dovey picture of a couple kissing, or traveling, or doing ridiculously contorted workout moves, it’s likely you’ll see the words #relationshipgoals. And while we know social media serves as more of a highlight reel than an accurate depiction of what a true relationship is like, people double tap and comment with heart-eyed emojis anyway. Jennifer Allen is looking to change the way we use the hashtag, in a broader effort to change the relationships we focus on and put our energy into, instead of our own. Allen has created #RelationshipGoals — a 12-month interactive workbook for couples in need of an algorithm adjustment, sans the "likes."
“In this social media age, everybody is so obsessed with #relationshipgoals, #goals hashtags are everywhere,” Allen says. “I find so many people are gauging their own love based on a picture that somebody posted online. There’s 24 hours in a day and you’re basing what your mate may or may not do for you off of a post of a girl getting flowers — when in reality you don’t even know the fight that could have came behind those flowers being received. The purpose of the workbook is for couples to become their own goals. That’s why naming it #RelationshipGoals was so important.”
By day, Allen works at an elementary school in Richardson ISD, but her 5-9 is Just Elope Dallas, a pop-up wedding company she runs with her husband that helps couples by relieving the stress, pressure and frustration that often come with wedding planning. So it’s safe to say that love is Allen’s turf. And when it came to developing content for the book, she pulled from a relationship she knows very well.
“Everything that I’ve written about in the journal and the other publications that I do are my real-life experiences,” Allen said. “Being married is hard, because you have to intentionally make that time to love the other person the way they want to be loved. For example, my husband is not a material person. I could buy him everything under the sun, but all he wants from me is my time. So anything I do for him that doesn’t involve us spending time together is really irrelevant because that’s not what he wants. The journal really does take you through the stages of learning what it is that your partner needs from you. Whether that’s how you handle conflict, or how they want you to love them, or how they would prefer your response to be when things happen. I think it’s so important to understand that the key to any relationship is being intentional. It takes work.”
Plastered under any lovey-dovey picture of a couple kissing, or traveling, or doing ridiculously contorted workout moves, it’s likely you’ll see the words #relationshipgoals. And while we know social media serves as more of a highlight reel than an accurate depiction of what a true relationship is like, people double tap and comment with heart-eyed emojis anyway. Jennifer Allen is looking to change the way we use the hashtag, in a broader effort to change the relationships we focus on and put our energy into, instead of our own. Allen has created #RelationshipGoals — a 12-month interactive workbook for couples in need of an algorithm adjustment, sans the "likes."
“In this social media age, everybody is so obsessed with #relationshipgoals, #goals hashtags are everywhere,” Allen says. “I find so many people are gauging their own love based on a picture that somebody posted online. There’s 24 hours in a day and you’re basing what your mate may or may not do for you off of a post of a girl getting flowers — when in reality you don’t even know the fight that could have came behind those flowers being received. The purpose of the workbook is for couples to become their own goals. That’s why naming it #RelationshipGoals was so important.”
By day, Allen works at an elementary school in Richardson ISD, but her 5-9 is Just Elope Dallas, a pop-up wedding company she runs with her husband that helps couples by relieving the stress, pressure and frustration that often come with wedding planning. So it’s safe to say that love is Allen’s turf. And when it came to developing content for the book, she pulled from a relationship she knows very well.
“Everything that I’ve written about in the journal and the other publications that I do are my real-life experiences,” Allen said. “Being married is hard, because you have to intentionally make that time to love the other person the way they want to be loved. For example, my husband is not a material person. I could buy him everything under the sun, but all he wants from me is my time. So anything I do for him that doesn’t involve us spending time together is really irrelevant because that’s not what he wants. The journal really does take you through the stages of learning what it is that your partner needs from you. Whether that’s how you handle conflict, or how they want you to love them, or how they would prefer your response to be when things happen. I think it’s so important to understand that the key to any relationship is being intentional. It takes work.”Plastered under any lovey-dovey picture of a couple kissing, or traveling, or doing ridiculously contorted workout moves, it’s likely you’ll see the words #relationshipgoals. And while we know social media serves as more of a highlight reel than an accurate depiction of what a true relationship is like, people double tap and comment with heart-eyed emojis anyway. Jennifer Allen is looking to change the way we use the hashtag, in a broader effort to change the relationships we focus on and put our energy into, instead of our own. Allen has created #RelationshipGoals — a 12-month interactive workbook for couples in need of an algorithm adjustment, sans the "likes."
“In this social media age, everybody is so obsessed with #relationshipgoals, #goals hashtags are everywhere,” Allen says. “I find so many people are gauging their own love based on a picture that somebody posted online. There’s 24 hours in a day and you’re basing what your mate may or may not do for you off of a post of a girl getting flowers — when in reality you don’t even know the fight that could have came behind those flowers being received. The purpose of the workbook is for couples to become their own goals. That’s why naming it #RelationshipGoals was so important.”
By day, Allen works at an elementary school in Richardson ISD, but her 5-9 is Just Elope Dallas, a pop-up wedding company she runs with her husband that helps couples by relieving the stress, pressure and frustration that often come with wedding planning. So it’s safe to say that love is Allen’s turf. And when it came to developing content for the book, she pulled from a relationship she knows very well.
“Everything that I’ve written about in the journal and the other publications that I do are my real-life experiences,” Allen said. “Being married is hard, because you have to intentionally make that time to love the other person the way they want to be loved. For example, my husband is not a material person. I could buy him everything under the sun, but all he wants from me is my time. So anything I do for him that doesn’t involve us spending time together is really irrelevant because that’s not what he wants. The journal really does take you through the stages of learning what it is that your partner needs from you. Whether that’s how you handle conflict, or how they want you to love them, or how they would prefer your response to be when things happen. I think it’s so important to understand that the key to any relationship is being intentional. It takes work.”

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